Category Archives: En Banc Decisions

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Split Circuit: Seventh Circuit Debate over Judicial Internet Research Ends in a Tie

The results are in this afternoon in the Seventh Circuit’s vote to rehear en banc Rowe v. Gibson, No. 14-3316 (Aug. 19, 2015), and it was a close one, a 4-4 tie, which means that the majority’s opinion stands, though not without an extraordinary exercise in defensiveness by the panel majority (but more on that below). A … Continue reading this entry

Much Ado About Nothing: The Defense of Judge Posner’s Internet Research

All the briefs are filed, and the next step in the saga of Rowe v. Gibson, No. 14-3316 (Aug. 19, 2015), is for the nine judges in regular active service on the Seventh Circuit to cast their votes in favor of or against rehearing the case en banc. We first wrote in August about Rowe, a decision written … Continue reading this entry

Judicial Internet Research: Dr. Posner Faces Peer Review

Last month, we wrote about the Seventh Circuit’s decision in Rowe v. Gibson, No. 14-3316 (Aug. 19, 2015), a decision written by Judge Richard Posner that created considerable controversy regarding the propriety of internet factual research by appellate courts. Now it appears that Judge Posner’s colleagues will have the opportunity to critique his methodology. Judge … Continue reading this entry

7th Cir. Explains What Same-Sex Marriage and Voter ID Have in Common

What do cases involving challenges to same-sex-marriage and voter ID laws have in common? The answer, according to a per curiam opinion issued today by a panel of judges from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Frank v. Walker, Nos. 14-2058 & 14-2059 (7th Cir. Sept. 30, 2014), is that both involve “laws enacted … Continue reading this entry

$30, Four Opinions, and No Decision: The Province and Duty to Say What the Law Probably Is

Federal appellate courts ordinarily grant en banc hearings or rehearings only when “(1) en banc consideration is necessary to secure or maintain uniformity of the court’s decisions; or (2) the proceeding involves a question of exceptional importance.” Fed. R. App. P. 35(a).  So, what happens when an en banc hearing produces no uniformity, or fails … Continue reading this entry